➥ [Ebook] ➠ La Musique d'une vie By Andreï Makine ➯ – Agedanna.info

La Musique d'une vie May , Alexe Berg, A Classical Pianist, Is Set To Perform His First Solo Concert In Moscow But Just Before His D But, His Parents His Father A Famous Playwright, And His Mother A Renowned Opera Singer Are Exposed For Their Political Indiscretions And Held Under Arrest With World War II On The Brink, And Fearing That His Own Entrapment Is Not Far Behind, Alexe Flees To The Countryside, Assumes The Identity Of A Soviet Soldier, And Falls Dangerously In Love With A General Officer S Daughter What Follows Is A Two Decades Long Journey Through War And Peace, Love And Betrayal, Art And Artifice A Rare Ensemble In The Making Of The Music Of A Life


About the Author: Andreï Makine

Andre Makine was born in Krasnoyarsk, Soviet Union on 10 September 1957 and grew up in city of Penza, a provincial town about 440 miles south east of Moscow As a boy, having acquired familiarity with France and its language from his French born grandmother it is not certain whether Makine had a French grandmother in later interviews he claimed to have learnt French from a friend , he wrote



10 thoughts on “La Musique d'une vie

  1. says:

    An intriguingly haunting novella about Russian concert pianist Alexei Berg how he took on the identity of a deceased soldier during World War II to escape deportation and the consequences that came in later years This book and author are an example of a book that I would have never heard of it it hadn t been for Goodreads I will be on the lookout for Makine and hope to read his award winning Dreams of Russian Summers because this prose was exq


  2. says:

    At 106 pages, this is a very short novel, but a very powerful and haunting one Makine is a master at finding emotion in small details This book opens with a narrator who is forced to spend a snowy night at a crowded station in the far east of the Soviet Union He stumbles on an old man at a piano going through the motions of playing but barely touching the keys This man helps him find a way on to the train and describes his life story over the course


  3. says:

    Music of a Life is a slim but poignant historical novel by Andrei Makine, a Russian novelist who wrote in French It is translated into English by Geoffrey Strachan who lent it an elegiac elegance.In the waiting room of a railway station in a Russian town in Urals, the unnamed narrator recounts an encounter twenty five years ago with an old musician, Alexei Berg, when they were both stranded by a snowstorm Makine s vivid prose captures the apathy and resigna


  4. says:

    This is the story of a thwarted life told to a stranger on a train And there s a fair amount of time to tell it The train runs from Siberia to Moscow, but still, considerable compression is necessary The book is short and the end is always near I stared into space a good 15 minutes once it came I had to get my bearings again This is a story that could have been mired in all kinds of sentimental clich The man was, after all, almost a concert pianist And at least 2


  5. says:

    Masterful Yet another author I ve discovered through the serendipity of a charity bookshop I couldn t put this down From the first word to the last, I was totally immersed not just in the story but in the power of the writing.The narrator meets an old man in a railway station and travels with him to Moscow When he first sees him, the old man is playing a piano silently, moving his fingers above the keys, and he is weeping During the course of the journey, the pianist rel


  6. says:

    For a short book, this packs a huge punch The story is told through a narrator of a Russian man who, several days before his debut performance as a concert pianist, must flee Moscow His is a harrowing tale of fear, uncertainty, determination, and adaptation to a new life as a soldier The emotions are palpable and, in the end, the resolution a relief This book, which was written in French, was the winner of the 2001 Grand Prix RTL Lire and is a great introduction to the work of


  7. says:

    Music of a Life by Andre MakineThis is a wonderful portrait of a Russian musician who flees his life to preserve his life when the artistic elite are being imprisoned by Stalin It is also a portrait of the battered Russians Makine labels Homo sovi ticas people who are so numbed by the unfair whims of those in power as well as their broken infrastructure that they simply bear it It is a cautionary tale for our times.A note The library Kindle copy I read needs a good proofing Po


  8. says:

    Update 8 8 2019 Because Alexe Berg is still hovering around my psyche days after reading his story, I m rounding my rating up to five stars and adding it to my favorites shelf for a reread Sometimes I m too stingy with my fives.Like some of my favorite blues tunes, this tiny novel fed my soul Makine packed an incredible amount of imagery, emotion and exceptional prose into these 112 pages, beginning with a snowed in, overcrowded railroad station in the Urals and its sad samples of Homo Sovie


  9. says:

    This is a novel that appeals to the sensitivity of the reader through its simplicity and musicality Framed by the waiting in a train station, the ride by train through the immensity of Russian lands covered by snow and the arrival to Moscow, this is a story of a life whose musicality although extirpated with brutality by the regime of those times, was mended by its hero with whatever meager means he had in hand The story of a person who longs for music in his life and who, thanks to the power of mu


  10. says:

    Although this book was finished in a day, and read in less than an hour, when finished it feels as if you have read an epic, not a novella The novel, a sweeping portrayal of a pianist caught in the drama of war, demonstrates the value of primacy of essence above form Falling in line with the weighty prose of Dostoevsky, Solzhenitsyn and Tolstoy No anguish or remorse The night through which he was advancing expressed this pain, this fear, and the irremediable shattering of the past, but this had all become


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